Climate Change Opinion Essay Graphic Organizer

The YPCCC is pleased to offer our downscaled climate change opinion estimates to the public. These data are distributed under the following terms of use. This is a legal agreement between you, the end-user (“User”) and Yale University on behalf of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (the “YPCCC”).  By downloading the survey data made available on this web site (“Data”) you are agreeing to be bound by the terms and conditions of this agreement.  If you do not agree to be bound by these terms, do not download or use the Data.The YPCCC hereby grants to the User a non-exclusive, revocable, limited, non-transferable license to use the Data solely for (1) research, scholarly or academic purposes, (2) the internal use of your business, or (3) your own personal non-commercial use.  You may not reproduce, sell, rent, lease, loan, distribute or sublicense or otherwise transfer any Data, in whole or in part, to any other party, or use the Data to create any derived product for resale, lease or license.  Notwithstanding the foregoing, you may incorporate limited portions of the Data in scholarly, research or academic publications or for the purposes of news reporting, provided you acknowledge the source of the Data (with express references to the YPCCC, as well as the complete title of the report) and include the following legend:The YPCCC bears no responsibility for the analyses or interpretations of the data presented here.

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The YPCCC has taken measures to ensure that the Data is devoid of information that could be used to identify individuals (e.g., names, telephone numbers, email addresses, social security numbers) who participated in or who were the subject of any research surveys or studies used to collect the Data (“Personally Identifying Information”).  However, in the event that you discover any such Personally Identifying Information in the Data, you shall immediately notify the YPCCC and refrain from using any such Personally Identifying Information.This license will terminate (1) automatically without notice from the YPCCC if you fail to comply with the provisions of this agreement, or (2) upon written notice (by e-mail, U.S. or otherwise) from the YPCCC.  Upon termination of this agreement, you agree to destroy all copies of any Data, in whole or in part and in any and all media, in your custody and control.This agreement shall be governed by, construed and interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Connecticut. You further agree to submit to the jurisdiction and venue of the courts of the State of Connecticut for any dispute relating to this Agreement. Please use the following citation in any work that makes use of the data and documentation as follows: Howe, Peter D., Matto Mildenberger, Jennifer R. Marlon, and Anthony Leiserowitz (2015). “Geographic variation in opinions on climate change at state and local scales in the USA.” Nature Climate Change, doi:10.1038/nclimate2583. Direct any questions to the YPCCC at climatechange@yale.edu.

The heat is on … and temperatures are rising to unprecedented levels all across the planet. In this BrainPOP movie, Tim and Moby explain how naturally occurring greenhouse gases in our atmosphere once helped transform Earth into a temperate and pleasant place. But as human civilization evolved our reliance on industry, manufacturing and large-scale agriculture has thrown this greenhouse effect out of whack. We’re burning more fossil fuels and generating more heat-trapping gasses, like carbon dioxide and methane, than our planet can process. That’s causing global warming on a scale we’ve never seen before. But the trouble isn’t just about temperatures. Climate change is leading to rising sea levels, water shortages, and more erratic, extreme weather conditions. We’ve already felt the effects of these shifts, but if we’re not careful things will only get worse and more people will fall victim to the ripple effects of a hotter Earth. So watch this movie to learn more about what you can do to help … before things get too hot to handle.

Climate Change Lesson Plan: Write and Deliver a Persuasive Speech

In this lesson plan, adaptable for grades 3-12, students explore BrainPOP resources to learn about climate change. Using what they learn, including the causes and effects of climate change, and solutions to this problem, students write and present a persuasive speech about why and how their schools should address climate change.   See more »

Natural Disasters Lesson Plan: Making Historical and Global Connections

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 3-8, students use BrainPOP resources to demonstrate an understanding of local natural disasters from historical, scientific and human impact perspectives. Students will communicate and collaborate with peers from different parts of the world to swap personal, natural disaster experiences. They’ll also create an innovative teaching product/method surrounding a natural disaster that impacts their area and deliver it to their virtual peers, who will reciprocate with products and discussions on natural disasters that impact them. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

Environmental Solutions Lesson Plan: A Webquest

In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 6, 7, and 8, students use BrainPOP resources, a WebQuest, and a graphic organizer to investigate different environmental problems. Students will also share and discuss other environmental problems and solutions associated with the problems they have just researched. Afterward, students will work with a group to choose a final project on a tic-tac-toe board and create an informative product to share with the rest of the class. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

Earth Cycles and Global Ecosystems Lesson Plan: Carbon Cycle, Nitrogen Cycle, and Water Cycle

In this multi-day lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 9-12, students use BrainPOP resources to identify the steps of the carbon, nitrogen, and water earth cycles. Students will also explore the significance of each cycle within global ecosystems and explain how human environmental impacts are affecting these three global cycles. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

Alternative Energy Sources Lesson Plan: Fossil Fuels’ Impact on the Environment

In this lesson plan for grades 6 through 12, students will use BrainPOP resources to learn how alternative sources of energy can be created and utilized. They’ll explore the impact of fossil fuels and alternative energy on our society and environment, and create an informational brochure to share important information about alternative energy. This lesson plan is aligned to Common Core State Standards.  See more »

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